2022: HOLD MY TEA! 🍵

this is perfect <3

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This trend will become very “interesting” for historians, archaeologists and art evaluators in, say, 50 years. Especially the part where the buyer decides on which version to keep. :popcorn:

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Avalance joseki is trending in Greece right now …

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2 posts were merged into an existing topic: WORDLE :negative_squared_cross_mark:

I think we’ll need a thread

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Cynically, you might suspect that the apology was a chance to get their product’s name in the papers. You could pretty well rely on some outlets taking it up for its humorous value.

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Let me calculate
20 000 000 / 330 000=61 euros for each case.

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“urged the Church to pay victims with its own assets, instead of asking parishioners to contribute”

That they need to be told to pay up…

On the other hand, we’re having a similar case here these days, and parishioners are sprouting up after the fact to say basically “well, we all knew but didn’t say anything because reasons” so it may be appropriate for them to help cover the cost.

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Why do they raise money to compensate for something the church did wrong?

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Where does church money come from anyway? From the parishioners? Including those who have been abused?

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It’s like raising taxes to pay for government mishandling of assets. :woman_shrugging:t2:

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Why should the Catholic church be expected to pay for something like that? The individuals within the church who acted wrongly are at fault. And this is coming from a Protestant.

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Because it was systemic and they were shielded by their organization. Church didn’t do anything to prevent harm, help victims or at least facilitate the proper actions.

I know the “companies aren’t people”, but it obscures the fact that companies don’t act, people do.

ETA: above was my interpretation, here’s from the relevant article, same idea:

“The Church not only did not take the necessary measures to prevent abuse but also turned a blind eye, failing to report abuse and sometimes knowingly putting children in touch with predators.”

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The church failed in preventing these individual from acting wrong and did little to stop this problem until it became a public scandal. Large parts of these sexual abuse scandals were not about the people who abused, but about the scale of the problem, the fact that the church knew about a lot of the cases, and that the church did little to prevent abusers from doing it again.

Say that there’s a school where it is uncovered that 12 teachers have been sexually abusing pupils, then certainly the directors of that school are to blame as well?

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The usual way churches and companies and schools etc react is: “move that person from office/ city A where word got out to B, so people forget about it in A and until it becomes a problem in B hopefully someone dies of old age”.

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Just to be clear, I do think the abusers should also carry the burden of recompensating the victims, probably the major part of it. But I see a fundraiser as a way for the church to wash their hands without actually changing anything about what happened (or will happen, for that matter). It looks good in the media, but that’s about it…

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At the end of the day, the abusers simply do not have the financial resources to fully compensate the victims. Of course, they should pay all of that they can and be thrown in jail for the rest of their lives, but that still falls short of remedying the terrible burden put upon the victims.

The victims have endured incredible harm and the costs to treat that harm are so enormous that only an organization can begin to fully pay for them. Clearly, the church is responsible as an organization for enabling and perpetuating the systemic abuse, so they should pay, and if those costs must be further passed onto its supporters, then that is what is needed to raise the funds to begin to heal the victims. However, deeper reforms are also clearly needed to address the organized evil that has corrupted the church.

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From what I’ve read on the subject, victims of similar crimes usually suffer deeper trauma from the “abandonment of society”, when perpetrators are shielded and go free, because it touches the deepest expectations of protection and justice we inherently believe comes with living in a civilized society.

Victims who see their abusers properly punished (money or not) tend to heal (as possible) better.

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