Images of olden times


#22

Easy to learn as checkers? sure. Easy to play as checkers? yeah… maybe not so much :stuck_out_tongue:


#23

Okay, if “olden times” needn’t be THAT old, then …

(from 1976)


#24

index

I Haz KO!
index


#25

Compare:
Goya, the sleep of reason creates monsters…

To:


#26

Empress Xiaoqin Playing Weiqi, Qing Dynasty (1644-1911AD), Collection of Palace Museum Beijing

The cosmos is a [weiqi] board,
The battlefield of Black and White —
Trivial as worms and ants,
Great as marquises and kings. (650)


#27

Notice, the Empress sits, but her opponent stands, in keeping with courtly propriety, I imagine.


#28

And the Empress figure is noticeably larger, which was the way status was indicated in Asian art at the time.

Mogadeet


#29

thx to:
(http://www.loc.gov/pictures/search/?st=grid&co=jpd2) again


#30


#31

Loving these. The one with the chair though … is that really a Go image? It looks like a story about hard times and how they had to burn the chair for … some reason?


#32

Your guess is as good as mine, but I found the motif on the chair to be distincly reminescent of a goban… So I decided to share, without having the slightest understanding :D. Maybe the depression goes far deeper showing a man so poor he had to turn a goban into a chair and then getting even poorer and as to having to burn the goban chair to keep warm :smiley:

WHO KNOWS!


#33

Zooming into the chair:

image

definitely not a Goban but probably a cane seat chair, like this:
image

And the text:

Bernard Palissy, inventor of enameled pottery, burns chairs to keep the furnace going

Here it is in higher resolution:

More interesting info about Palissy:


#34

Don’t mean to be a spoilsport, but perhaps the pattern on the chair is just wickerwork. The English note at the bottom says, “Bernard [?], inventor of enameled pottery burns chairs to keep the furnace going. [?] Published by the Department of [antiquities?].” No clue there, unfortunately. I wonder what the Chinese text at the top says.


#35

@trohde: Amazing. We both hit on the idea at the same time. You somehow got much better resolution out of the photo, however.


#36

Well, I’ve sat on many such chairs, so it was clear to me :wink: It only took me so long to post it b/c I needed to find the English term for such a seating surface.


#37

Reminds me, BTW, how once I had to burn shelves in a very cold winter — I think it was in 1996, –26,5° C (–15.7 F) — in order to keep the masonry heater going … didn’t have the money to buy firewood :unamused: )

(And sorry for that much OT :wink: )


#38

Granted, I am no chair expert, neither an expert on japanese culture, but I have yet to see a wicker chair with a solid wooden frame like that. And were they even a thing for a lowly potter at that time? You guys and your reality is boring :smiley:

My story was much more fun…

Now you’re gonna go ahead and tell me the nice lady is not actually sawing a go game to her husband’s kimono :frowning:


#39

Being quite off-topic now but I guess I sat on some of those too. My grandma had those sort of chairs when I was little.


#40

Hmmmm :neutral_face: okay then. I am out of arguments :grinning:


#41

That chair is appears to be 21x21 rather than 19x19 anywy. :wink: