Questions That Don't Deserve Their Own Thread

As in US states?
Edit: I guess you edited at some point, but now I’m even more confused.
State with state you mean between countries?
Who’s complaining?
Do you mean it as a way to study in another country?

Yes, between countries. What I’m saying is when you see “free study” in the policy of the country (like in France for example) it’s only a side of a coin, it’s free for the student not by generosity of the hosting country but because the country of the student will pay for him.

So it’s completely normal to use the difference of systems in your advantage, and good argument against those jealous who can’t stand the “generous” policy of their country.

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I believe that this is indeed a large part of why education is cheap / free in Europe. Most universities I know here earn a ton from foreign students (from outside the EU). The COVID crisis has put an enormous dent in that, which means that suddenly a lot of funding has disappeared. Although the internal borders of the EU are open, and most universities are running more or less as normal, it’s difficult (at least for me) to find funding for anything, suddenly, because the stream of foreign students has stopped.

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I don’t know anything about post grad studies, but I’d say for us is probably mostly taxes.
I know we have foreign students here and there, but I can’t imagine people rush to study on our vandalized desks.

  1. If someone asks for a review with per own (partial) review, is there a way to add to it or should I make a new one from the game?
  2. Can I quote from another thread?

I actually found someone beginning a thread with a quote. Is there a way to figure out how the person did it?

When you quote something, you can just copy-paste it to a message in another thread. Another way, is to start your message, then go to another page and quote something (which will appear in your message for the original page).

For example, while typing this message, I went to the “How intuitive is OGS” thread and quoted you:


The owner of the review can give you control to edit it (by making new variations / adding move specific comments). They can give you control if you’re present in the review by opening the menu when clicking on your name:

image

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I have a question for my imperial system friends:

I’m 175cm. I always knew the conversion as 5’ 9’’, but I’m now told (with google proof), that it’s actually 5’7’’.
My understanding, when I did the conversion, was that it’s 5 feet and 7/10 of a feet, so roughly 5 feet and 9 inches.
Because I’m in a bit of a messy discussion where I’m told that I’m for some reason claiming I’m tall for “reasons”, can someone clarify?

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High shoes maybe? Oki I’m out

This is approximately correct.

175 cm is about 5.741 feet according to Google. However, a foot is 12 inches, and that fractional part of a foot is about 8.89764 inches. So 5 feet and 9 inches is a reasonable conversion from 175 cm.

Whoever gave you that proof is incorrect. Tell them that a self-acclaimed pedant from the internet says that they are wrong.

You seem to be significantly taller than average for women. In the 92nd percentile according to this website: https://tall.life/height-percentile-calculator-age-country/

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I always thought ’ is for feet or minutes (both time and degrees), " is for inches or seconds

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Yes, in the US, it is quite common to use the single apostrophe/quote for feet (and minutes) and the double apostrophe/quote for inches (and seconds). Of course, one does not typically have to mix these units, since fortunately our physics education usually does use the metric system (even if we do occasionally make astronomical mistakes due to units).

Imagine the horror of writing 120 feet per second as 120 '/"

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Actually, northern Greek women (Macedonia and thereabouts) are on average taller than the average Greek woman. Most Greek women models and Greek basketball women players used to come from there, although as years pass this isn’t as prominent.
Although we are the size of a button on the map, regional features are still a thing. :woman_shrugging:
Edit to clarify: I’m not from Northern Greece, I just thought it was an interesting trivia.

@Vsotvep, that was my understanding for years now, I wrote 5’9’’ as in 5 feet, 9 inches. I guess google converted just to feet, so the person got 5.7 feet in reality, not 5’7’’.

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I was watching a tiktok the other day (yes, I still do watch tiktoks, shame on me), and some student was saying that, for some reason, their college (?) professor was making them memorize all the physics stuff in yards etc, and all the students were rioting because they of course use imperial in everyday life, but their understanding was metric goes for physics, and they basically will have to unlearn and relearn everything.

I don’t know if it was exaggerated for tiktok reasons, but I can’t say I find it entirely unbelievable.

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I think most engineers and scientists in the US prefer metric, since it makes typically everything much easier, especially when dealing with international equipment suppliers.

However, there’s always bound to be a few people in any discipline that will cling to those “Freedom Units” in a misguided display of jingoism.

:us: :eagle: :fireworks:

Y’all got your :popcorn: ready for the show tomorrow?

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New word. I hadn’t heard of that. Too bad it won’t be obsolete any time soon. :-/

I have many things to write, but I want to respect the forum policies. Let’s just say I care about the result very much and I will quote “it ain’t over until it’s over”.

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Sure do! That being said, I think there is a good chance that the result will be unknown for at least several days because the Supreme Court has allowed quite a few major swing states to go a “few” days beyond tomorrow for a “guaranteed” vote count.

What that actually means is probably very debatable though. I just hope there is honesty and proper counting above all else.

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This is literally always the case, though. This just hits as a bit of a perfect storm, because we have a) substantially more mail-in ballots than typical, b) the single most litigious president in history, and c) what’s shaping up to be a relatively close election in key areas.

As for mail-in ballots, there are two reasons these can be counted after election day. First, in most states, they are considered valid if postmarked by election day, and received within some statutory period after election dat, usually 3-7 days. Second, some states are not even permitted to begin tabulating these ballots (per state law, not federal law) until election day. If there’s suddenly millions more ballots to count in a single day, the process simply won’t be completed in that same day. However, this isn’t a departure from any other election. In fact, many votes cast that day in person aren’t counted before a winner is declared. It all ends up coming down to statistical viability, which gets real complicated (and also why following the AP is a better source than, say, MSNBC, because the AP uses a 99.5% confidence interval before calling any state.)

Beyond that, there are always provisional ballots that aren’t counted until days after the election. These also only matter in the absolute closest of contests, but also are a thing every year.

There is no reason to believe that the counts will be inaccurate. Voter fraud accounts for hilariously low numbers of ballots - historically about one in thirty million votes. Even if we had a thousand times as much voter fraud this year, that’s still only going to account for about 5,000 fraudulent votes nationally - a net effect of 0.003% (assuming a turnout of 150,000,000 voters.)

Much larger concerns to be are, for example, the Republicans attempting to sue Texas (now a swing state) into tossing out something like 140,000 ballots. Fortunately, the court ruled that the party didn’t even have standing to sue in the first place, but still, it’s a fairly overt voter suppression tactic, and substantially more impactful than the go-to GOP boogeyman of “voter fraud”.

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There are two sides to every story even though it can be hard to determine which one is actually correct these days. And with the mainstream media consistently proving to lean much further to the left than right, it only makes since that Trump is painted as a ridiculously insane man. Dropping nukes on hurricanes? There are actually some people that don’t believe he said that. Coronavirus? I don’t know why he gets all the blame as no one really knew what to do when the virus started and, while we have learned a lot, we still have a lot to learn in terms of controlling this. Moreover, I would say the local government of each state is much more responsible as they have made their own respective decision for their local area. How about people fingering Trump for being racist as he sees all the violent rioting and looting that has damaged, and often destroyed the lives and livelihoods of black and white Americans, as more problematic than the death of George Floyd and all the racism (which is probably lower than it ever has been before in US history) that exists in the country which, don’t get me wrong here, is in fact still truly terrible and unfortunate.

Now how often do people hear about the Hunter Biden scandal and all the things Trump supporters say that Biden messed up during his political career? Or maybe it is all Republican conspiracy that doesn’t hold any water. I really don’t know.

The point of the argument I am trying to make here is that, in today’s political atmosphere, on both the right and left, it is hard to know where the truth lies. Everyone (myself included) often has there own, often very biased opinion about the “truth” of what really happens/happened. So I would say that it is perfectly reasonable for Trump and others to suggest that there might be quite a bit of fraud in the election. It would also be perfectly reasonable for Biden to suggest the same about Trump (somewhat related, though not directly, to your example in Texas). Very few people actually probably know where most of the truth is.

With politics, I have had to learn to take absolutely everything with a grain of salt and understand that there is leverage on twisting the truth to support a given political party. Based on my comments here, it probably seems like I am a little biased, but the truth is that, with anything politically “factual,” I have learned that nothing I hear should be taken as the 100% guaranteed truth. And it is for the same reason that I try not pull statistical conclusions for something like voter fraud out of “comprehensive” studies that could very well be biased and/or skewed. That being said, your statement could be entirely right, it just seems foolish to me to assume that with a guarantee as given in my argument above.

At the end of the day, everyone has to pick one side of the story that they believe is likely the truth, see what has affected their own lives, and make their own decision. That is why some people support Biden and also why some people seem crazy enough to support Trump. I do not want this topic to get hot, as I understand it often does for a lot of people including myself, so I probably won’t comment much more. You all are entitled to your own opinions and what you believe and so I respect that. Quite frankly I am not even old enough to vote yet. It is a hard time that we all live in so take care folks.

May the best man win.

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To be honest, I’m quite astonished that the idea to just stop counting votes because the result needs to be known is even taken seriously. Don’t both parties have a desire to make the system at least appear to be fair? Not counting votes because there wasn’t enough time does exactly the opposite.

I’m not sure if I’d call Fox News to be “learning further to the left than to the right”. Fox News, as far as I’m aware, is the largest mainstream media in the US as well.

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