European Go Journal: May 2022

In the May edition of the European Go Journal, we plan to publish an interview with Martin Stiassny, the EGF President. If you have any questions that you would like to ask him - please let us know, we might include them in the interview!

Leave your questions in the comments or send them to our email address: contact@eurogojournal.com

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I would like to know if EGF is interested in expanding their accessibility by investing more in online tournaments.
If so, do they feel they missed an opportunity by not taking advantage of the special circumstances (and opportunities) created by the pandemic?

To the very few online tournaments that happened, we saw a distinct and obvious reluctance to incorporate measures with a more broad, inclusive and long-term plan in mind, instead focusing on rigid “videotape yourselves” instructions, and with everyone’s mind to the moment that, finally, “real” tournaments would resume.

Is it a strategic choice of the EGF to focus on a player base already in countries with established Go presence and access?

I of course respect it, if so, but I would like to hear the federation’s thoughts on the matter.

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Maybe better contact the EGF directly: tournamentrules@eurogofed.org

Source:
https://www.eurogofed.org/egf/commissions.htm
https://www.eurogofed.org/egf/

I agree, I think this question is related to a specialized topic and doesn’t fit a general interview. It would probably be better to ask the EGF directly.

I couldn’t help but bring my neglected plebeian grievances in, but I would have guessed

“how does the driver’s seat of EGF feel about online go”

isn’t just an “inquiry” of no interest to the general public. :woman_shrugging:t2:

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I think it’s a good question. My version would be: How could the EGF best use online opportunities to further the spread of Go?
Or more specifically, how can the EGF improve online tournament experience? Or do you think EGF could make online tournaments easier to access?

Or are online tournaments a way to encourage participation in competitive Go, especially by newer players?

I would be interested to see how participation in online tournaments compared to IRL ones and what conclusions might be drawn from this.

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Question: Is there going to be a centralised plan to incorporate Go in the various European countries, instead of leaving it in the hands of just hobbyists and part-time amateurs.

Elaboration in case you want to alter the words of the question: Go is a cultural product/factor/element (whichever you prefer) of China, Japan and Korea which are, all three, very wealthy and influential countries. It strikes me as odd that their embassies wouldn’t be interested in helping fund and organise a grassroots cultural sharing via a game like Go, aimed, mainly at schools and young people (not only it is the best age to learn Go, but it is the best age to learn and open your mind to other cultures).

I assume that in the top tier countries of the EU championship there is a vibrant community that nurtures new players, but that is definitely not the case on the lower tiers. As far as we are concerned (Greece) we are struggling to even fill the four seats at the tournament days, let alone get new people involved, and I’ve noticed the same trend in most of the other teams down there. And, let’s face it, we are not getting any younger or get to have more free time as time goes by.

Aternative way to set the question: There is a good possibility that Go, in a lot of lower tier countries, will cease to even have a presence in a couple of decades. Are they planning on doing anything about that?

Thank you for your time and taking the initiative for that interview. :slight_smile:

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Dear friends, I passed all your questions to Martin. He will respond if he finds it useful!

Meanwhile, some more news.

Last winter Anna Chernova and her family went to the Dominican Republic for a vacation. Unfortunately, at the same time Russia started a war against Ukraine, Anna’s home country, so their return flight was canceled. To help her children relax by playing go, Anna decided to contact the local go federation, which proved a great decision!

Later Anna asked Aristides Ledesma Mendez, the president of the Dominican Go Federation, to write an article on go in their country, while she has also written down her own impressions.

You will find Anna’s and Aristides’ articles in the May edition of the European Go Journal.

Subscribe on Patreon to receive future issues of the EGJ automatically: European Go Journal is creating a monthly journal about the game of go (baduk, weiqi) | Patreon

Photo: beginners’ tournament in the Dominican Republic.

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