How do I Improve at go

#1

How do I improve at go, I’ve truly tried every method I can. I am about 15/16 kyu, yet since I got here I haven’t improved one bit I tried Tsumego way too boring and frustrating, my reading ability sucks so bad, same with my visualisation and I tried tsumego quite a bit the only ones I get are like go problems for beginners volume 2 and I suck so bad with reading and visualisation that I can’t do any problems past 8, I tried memorising pro games for 50 moves, Guess what I memorised it but forgot it after 1 day, my memory sucks, I tried just playing it doesn’t do anything when I am 16 kyu I just get crushed literally every time, I can’t do a proper review to save my life. Even if I find mistakes I just forget it after like 4 minutes, I’ve truly tried everything, How do I improve?

#2

How about a teaching game?

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#3

But is a teaching game going to help him? and what if he can’t find one or someone won’t give him a teaching game?

#4

There’s usually tons of people offering teaching games here. Teachers are a good way to point out things that you don’t spot yourself, or explain things in a way that you haven’t thought about yet.

If it’s correspondence, I’m okay with playing a teaching game. I bet @Adamr is about to offer one as well, since he’s typing.

4 Likes
#5

Hello @Saiofthefujiwara, welcome to the forums.

This is of course a difficult question, and there can hardly be a definate answer, but I can relate :smiley:
I think no matter what way you chose, it is likely that you ARE improving. However the pace can be slower than one would wish, and it is expected that there always comes a time, when our growth as a go players sort of flattens. We cannot all be the best players in the world, especially since go is nothing more than a hobby for most of us.

That said, of course we all want to improve and I guess to improve one needs to find his/her thing :slight_smile: after all we all learn differently. If you find tsumego boring, I personally would not do tsumego. If it is a hobby it should be fun. Why ruin it with something that is not fun for you? How much can you really expect to improve by doing something you have no enthusiasm for…

For me personally videos were probably the biggest help. I very much enjoy watching a strong player talk about moves and his/her idea behind them. And that helped me a lot. Reviews by stronger players are very much a similar idea, and probably my second favourite thing. Sadly I do not really do live games lately, but if you are a correspondence player too I would be happy to play a game and try and review it - feel free to send me a challenge. (Damn @Vsotvep :smiley: you are a step ahead)

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#6

‘‘especially since go is nothing more than a hobby for most of us’’, From the way this guy was typing he seems very serious about go, a person who thought of it as a hobby would probably give it up after that or just play games for fun. hes probably aiming for at least 1 dan. and if i am not wrong people on here almost never ever offer to review a game :confused:

#7

Welcome to OGS.

My view is two ways:

  1. Play more games and review, including self review. If I can find one or two points to improve for the game I just played, I am happy. This thing takes time.
  2. Study: read books, watch videos, whatever you like. I like to read books, because of their structured teaching of concepts of all perspectives. Many concepts, we just can not figure out ourselves.
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#8

well, ‘‘1. Play more games and review, including self review. If I can find one or two points to improve for the game I just played, I am happy. This thing takes time.’’, He said he reviews games but forgets the mistakes made in it, The second sentence advice I agree with, except the videos because the people in there just make it walls of text :slight_smile:

#9

I think people tend to review reading/fighting moves. I mainly review big things like directional play, sente, timing etc and ignore reading “mistakes”. Reading takes real strength and time to improve.

Then repetition of same/similar mistakes are normal. Regret is a good thing. It helps to reinforce memory.

Some repetitive mistakes are not just mistakes, but rather a reflection of shallow understanding of the basic concepts.

#10

No, you haven’t tried everything.

Try hard, tedious work, every single day. There’s no shortcut.

If it was that easy to improve, it wouldn’t be 50% of the entire playerbase that’s ranked 12k or below.

You improve by precisely doing all the menial chores. Tsumego, lots of them, the right way, every day, for months. Memorizing and replaying games every day for months will lay the foundation for your brain to develop shape intuition. Doing it once won’t do jack.

You don’t get jacked by lifting 100kg once. You start weight training with smaller weights and slowly increase the weight. You do more elaborate exercises while giving it your all. You constantly have to push yourself, otherwise you will stagnate.

You don’t become a great painter by copying some else’s amazing drawing through tracing paper. It takes a lot of dedicated effort. Just like everything else. If you want to get good, work your ass off.

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#11

I have a very bad memory so if I review games I forget the mistakes I make after like 5/10 minutes. Nevertheless thanks for the advice.

#12

I actually tried doing tsumego for a lot of time not just 1 day and I do work hard everyday.

#13

About reading books I don’t know the right way to read them, I tried putting them out on book and memorising them but it didn’t work,

#14

Thanks for the advice :slight_smile:

#15

Tell me how many books have you read and what are they?

#16

Take notes while playing and while reviewing. And try to find your most common errors. Review your notes if necessary.

#17

I’ve read ‘’opening theory made easy”, And grades go problems for beginners but I couldn’t get past problem 8 unless I went by intuition which is “not the right way to do it”.

#18

I tried this, but the problem is I don’t understand why it’s a bad move.

#19

You read only one book and are 15kyu. Sounds reasonable to me. Be patient my friend. :grinning:

Here is my book list. I actually read those or similar topics before and I am just a 4kyu.

I bet most if not all 1d+ players read more than me.

#20

Ye, but the problem is I don’t know the right way to read them.