How do you pronounce "OGS"?

Pedantry: does pudgy really have a soft G, or is dg a digraph?

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Why not both? Seems like it would still be considered a soft g as it certainly isn’t hard!

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What I meant by a digraph is like gh in rough or enough, a grouping of two letters to create a different sound.

Is dg a d + a sort of super-soft g? Or is it a silent d + a regular soft g?

Or is it a digraph with the sound of a soft g?

And in, say, budge or lodge, should dge be considered a trigraph?

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I wonder if questions like that have answers…

Here’s one: is “olo” in colonel a trigraph? Or is “colonel” a septagraph??

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Others have pointed out that “lough” presents a tenth distinct pronunciation of “ough”, and that, in contrast, it’s funny how “pony” and “bologna” rhyme.

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OT but also related, and maybe ask permission if applicable

I’m listening to something.

Speaker: Emperor X the Hoarse, hoarse as in voice not horse as in…
Me:
Speaker: face.
Me: Oh.

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And how goose and house rhyme

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Neither. Everyone plays on OGS. :smiley:

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Ah, so you’re in the silent G camp

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Wait what? They don’t in any English I’ve heard???

Goo-ss
How-ss

Which one are you pronouncing like the other and why?

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They rhyme in the north of England… tha’s a canny wee house fa tha goose…

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“There’s a moose loose aboot this hoose” (“There’s a mouse loose about this house”), a standard cliché highlighting Scots language pronunciation.

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There are reasons for our Australian mods to be confused about ‘Goose’ and ‘House’ atm:

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That’s Scottish English / Scots, not Northern English (as TPR pointed out).

Although to be fair, I don’t know how far Scottish phonology seeps over the border. It’s not what I’d associate with “Northern English”, though.

I was quoting Geordies not Scottsmen… and they’d have your guys for garters if you suggested they were leaky Scotts…

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Fair. I’m much more familiar with the Yorkshire accent so that’s where my mind goes on hearing the “Northern English” term.

Apologies for the false correction ^^

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9 posts were split to a new topic: History of the English pigs oppressing the Northern haggis-eating, caber-tossers

No discussion yet on the tones.
Would you agree on O1 G3 S4?

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I just say ogues, first tone (flat)

I recently suggested it be pronounced “mogs”.

Alternatively, with OGS’ heavy adoption of twitch bannering, a case could be made for pronouncing it as “pogs”.

pog means “hype” on twitch, deriving from a now-replaced emote of the excited face of Ryan Gutierrez on winning a game of pogs (milk caps).

Oh, nothing new under the sun ^^

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