Storing the amount of time a player spent for a move

The analysis of games played on-line is really valuable for improving. The information about the speed of play is very important when trying to help someone get better. I could not find this feature when opening games for later analysis - maybe I am missing something.

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Hi,

Welcome in OGS.

The main reason the time for each move is not shown is the lag of a good way to display it without cluttering the interface (and developer time). Feel free to provide suggestions.

PS to interested developers: The frontend is open source and the move timings (in ms) are already provided by the API. So anyone interested in developing this feature can do it.

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Is that what that 3rd number in the moves array is? I always thought it’s some sort of hash to prevent registering duplicate moves… In what kind of unit is it maintained?

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Hi,

First of all - thanks for the quick answer.
If move timings are provided, it would be great to have an option to save it to SGF like this:
;B[dd]BL[286.637]
;W[jj]WL[299.413]
;B[pd]BL[257.087]
;W[jd]WL[296.229]
;B[dp]BL[253.078]
;W[pp]WL[293.194]
;B[dj]BL[246.593]
;W[jp]WL[290.405]
;B[pj]BL[243.078]
;W[fp]WL[285.613]
;B[fq]BL[236.397]
;W[gq]WL[283.69]
This should fit the purpose without cluttering the interface.
Thanks!
Damir

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It’s milliseconds.

There is actually a button available to moderators to display these in a raw table for a game.

As Flovo said, that hasn’t been “niced up for useres”, but that code should show what and where it is.

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Hmm, it sounds very interesting: how to become a moderator :slight_smile: ?

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TBH I personally hadn’t realised an average user would care about the timings.

It might not take much (if anything) to make them available.

Can you talk a bit more about how it will help you?

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I understand: players usually do not care too much about that. On the other hand, I like to point out the need to use more (or less) time to young children I try to teach how to play. Even for stronger players (5kyu - 7kyu), it could be helpful to show that some “not-so-good” moves are played almost automatically.

Indeed, I found the Online Go Server worth translating to Croatian (recently) and using the OGS demo board (combined with discord), I feel almost as doing it in a club, with a big difference that children are living in different cities.

During last weekend, we had a “real-time” tournament with 90 players (of these: 60 children under 12 or 16) from 10 countries: manual pairing, 5 rounds in two days and it worked great, thanks to the features of OGS: https://online-go.com/group/5774
With the help of a single spreadsheet we used OGS ids to make challenging really easy.

I would be happy to help in getting OGS even better, although I am not good enough in programming.

All the best!
Damir

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Thanks for that - now that you say it, it seems obvious.

I’ll explore what it would take to “tidy this up” so users can see it.

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Hi Eugene,

CGoban has had this feature for years: each player’s remaining time condtions, including byoyomi, are displayed for each move during replay, just like during the real game.

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Note that this is subtly different to what the OP asked for, and would not serve the same purpose easily. It would definitely supplement it nicely though.

If you want to ask “where did I respond too quickly without thinking”, knowing the remaining time on each move is interesting (IE “oh I responded here quickly because I was out of time”) but doesn’t directly tell you how quickly each move was made.

FWIW “time spent on each move” is readily available, just need to turn on and tidy up the display of it, wheras how to come up with remaining time seems daunting, under things like byo-yomi etc.

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Thank you very much for recognizing the importance of an apparently small issue.
Online Go Server seems to be the most versatile go platform available today.
All the best!
Damir

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In correspondence games, is the time stored starting when the opponent moves or when a player opens the game the next day?

It’s the total elapsed time, irrespective of when anyone is looking at it.

IE its not telling you how much time they spent looking in the browser at the game, it’s telling you how long it took them to reply with their move from your move.

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