Things I would tell my younger self

“Try all kinds of stuff, but don’t do more hobbies than your time permits.”

“Think about what you want to do as a job.”

“Don’t procrastinate your exams at Uni.”

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For me it was exactly like this and it worked out fine.
So I’m not so sure about these advises.

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I wouldn’t tell anything to my younger self. Life is like a go game, with imperfect moves. You don’t have to play like an AI in order to have a good game. Whatever the situation what is done is done, and as long as you are alive you can hope for a better future and it’s generally not too late to do what you “should” have done earlier.

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My younger self wouldn’t listen anyway :woman_shrugging:t2:

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Great point! :slight_smile: And just like Go, you usually learn more by the defeats and mistakes, than from someone externally having told you what is “a better choice”.

I would, however, send a message to my younger self for some mistakes that didn’t really generate anything useful in the long term. E.g. I realised far too late that light daily physical training was very effective and I had a totally wrong impression/knowledge on the matter. Or being interested in learning more DIY stuff far earlier. Or buying earlier some very cheap tools that have now made our lives so much easier and safer. Small stupid mistakes like that, which did no good to anyone, but could have made such a big difference.

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Things may vary with the institution. What i noticed was a huge jump from an easy guided life in family into a fully free life on your own.

This was the main reason why 50% failed the first year so my advices would be

1 do what you like. Enjoy studying what interest you.
2 find positive friends to accompany you in studies. Loneliness is a killer.

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“Check out that game called Go!”

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Actually when I was a student in 1991, someone created a go club but I didn’t try that game, thinking it was uninteresting. I only came back to it 25 years later… But no regrets, I had other hobbies anyway. You can learn go at any age.

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One of my good friends never wanted that i introduce him the game. Until 7 years later someone else did it and he had then a lot of regrets…

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I hope my younger self wouldn’t avoid Go forever if introduced to it too early. But I think it would be worth the try.

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children not always appreciate the same as their parents. That’s it.

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“Enjoy the ride”

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You managed to be alive, and somehow, maybe not fine, but not too bad either.

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Whatever I would say to my younger self, doesn’t really mater. I am quite sure he would say: “Hey boomer, mind your own business and please let me make my own mistakes.”

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Whether my younger self would listen or not, I believe it’s valuable to reflect on this.

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“Don’t ask me, I haven’t a clue”

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Here’s one that applies to me (at least), and I had to learn over the years.

“Competing with others will not make you happy.”

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You don’t know in advance if competition makes you happy or not, you need to try first. What’s important is to be aware of all possibilities. So if I had to tell my younger self anything on that subject, I’d say: if you want to compete, go ahead, but there are other ways if you don’t want to. I could tell stories of successes or failures of people I know (including me), but ultimately you have to make your own decisions. In a game, several good moves are available, I’m not even sure myself which ones are best. The only thing I might do is to give a warning in case of an obvious big and irreversible mistake, like putting one’s life in danger.

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“Just focus on corner-sides-middle, and making good shape with your stones. Don’t try to contact fight so much”

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“Don’t try to create a temporal paradox by giving advice to your younger self.”

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