Visualize go this way, instantly make it 30 times easier to count

Since you are replying to me, I clarify: I was not talking at all about the difference in diameter between white and black stones, nor was I referring to the advantage of holes or cavities for blind and visually impaired players.

My answer was informative at least for others who read your post.

It was not informative for me. I am serious about my suggestion to try out a depression at each intersection. While it certainly would not work the same way a magnetic board does, I think it would provide a new level of comfort for all of us who love real boards and stones: much less fiddling with the positions of stones so as to see their relationships more clearly.

To clarify: I am not opposed to assistive technologies for blind and visually impaired people; indeed, I have done a bit of work and am educated in that area.

But my interest in go is here focused on a specific serious proposal. Does anyone agree that playing Go would be easier and more fun with a board that works the way I described?

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I can certainly imagine a go board similar to an Abalone board.


I suppose this would work quite well when playing go in a train or something similar. The stones probably won’t shift when the ride is a bit bumpy.

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Montessori multiplication (10x10) and division (9x9) boards:

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What about the hexagonals? New game: Stigmergy • Life In 19x19

Absolutely brilliant!

Tumbleweed minus the stacking? :slight_smile:

Oh says it was based on it :slight_smile: I suppose the more or less free placement of stones (no suicides) does make it have more of a Go feel, although capturing with lines of sight is the non-go part.

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Interesting … in the early 1980s I had the idea to create a Go board with a copper sheet into which I wanted to punch dents where the intersections are, with black and white marbles as stones … sadly I never got to make it real.

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Interesting contributions. Unfortunately, OGS is no longer sending me email notifications whenever my postings have replies; instead, it sends me what looks like a summary of random postings once in a while.

The worst of both worlds! :smiley:

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There already exists equipment for playing Go with stones inside the squares

image

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Wait wait wait wait wait…

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becomes

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Yet

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becomes

image

?!

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Where did you get this stones ?

From the video above

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I don’t know what game they’re playing here but it certainly isn’t Go!

:laughing:


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It’s 10 in a row

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My search of the origin of kyu ranking, lead me to a full-blown search of the late 19th century Go community and society, and I found quite some interesting references to Go.

This is a page from a book published in 1891 (明治24年) named - “遊戯算術” - (learn) math in games. It talked about tic-tac-toe (even spelled differently as Tit-tat-to) and its generalized case to a larger board size (and immediately switch topic to checkerboard with a completely different game on the next page). From the prefix, the author talked about his inspiration and sources from magazines outside of Japan, and in the page, he recommended using go stones and boards to play and find variations without needing to draw.

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Did you ever try playing go with an abalone set ? How is it with a hexa grid, too easy to live?

I’ve never played go on a hexagonal grid, but I can imagine that the game would progress more slowly. Stones have many liberties, so it may take more moves to attack or make eyes.

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