Why is there no "I" on the board

It goes A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,J. What’s the deal? just curious.

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Usually done that way to avoid confusion with lower case L or 1 I think.

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When the original creator of Go discovered the inherent beauty and complexity of what he had wrought, he took a solemn vowel to give thanks to the Gods.

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The latin alphabet had no letter J. :man_shrugging:

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I think the letter I is usually skipped just to avoid potential confusion and transcription errors.

This convention seems to be followed in most places that use the “A1” coordinate system (borrowed from chess). However, a notable exception was seen in the broadcast of one of the most famous series of games:

In AlphaGo vs Lee Sedol match, the official live commentary is performed by Michael Redmond using a large magnetic wall goban that has the letter I in the coordinates. His board also has “A1” in the top-right instead of the bottom-left.

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This question has been asked many times. The best answer is as @AdamR said above—depending on font, it can look like i or 1 or l.





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Perhaps this could be added to the FAQ?

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DON’T BELIEVE THE LIES

THE I EXISTS!

truth1

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#IlluminatiConfirmed

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And that is why there is no “I”. Because the Eye must always remain hidden :scream:. But like a hidden Excel column, the Eye is always hidden in plain sight :face_with_monocle:

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My vote goes to flovo. I believe the issue is with ‘i’ and ‘j’. I have a vinyl board similar to this one where it is in fact the jay that is omitted:

VinylGoBoard

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And what about the k?

Interesting that it also uses letters to mark the rows instead of the columns.

Nick Sibicky uses a magnetic display board with letters marking the rows, however, that’s only because it is a modified board that originally had Chinese characters marking the rows (see earlier vs later videos from him).

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The k was seldom used in latin but accepted as a letter in its own right. It survived in some very old abbreviations and personal names like Kaeso.
The J however was only a graphical variant of I up to the 20th century; at least in the german speaking world Oskar Korschelt grew up in. I know people whose last name is Imfeld, but they write Jmfeld.

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@Sanonius,
I’m German, and our handwritten “I” looks quite like a “J”, but sits on the base line (3rd line), while our handwritten “J” goes below the base line and has a loop:
image

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Ich weiss, in der Schweiz schreiben wir auch so :wink: and nowadays the J is a fully independent letter, of course.

But Fraktur and early Antiqua fonts don’t do the difference, as also the german wikipedia claims to know: https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/J

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