How not to get bored during a lockdown

Is this a moderately subtle joke where the ignorance of the thugs is illustrated by them responding with adjectives to Arnie’s request for verbs?

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Here’s a colouring book made by Rock Paper Cynic: https://rockpapercynic.tumblr.com/post/613038768679731200/rpc-colouring-books

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And if you’d like to do something actually useful, you can participate in citizen science, e.g. here: https://www.zooniverse.org/

(I did that a few years ago, before I had a baby, and spent many hours classifying animals in the Serengeti :grin: )

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Shouldn’t the tengen points of the edge boards be the new star points though ? Whole board joseki FTW :slight_smile:

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It seems black is preparing a huge mojo on the lower right. What do you think, can white still invade here?

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That’s pretty damn cool. I wanna do it but on the other hand it sounds like an endless sink of my free time I should be spending elsewhere.

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check the OGS go forum every hour

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Or every few minutes :upside_down_face:

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YouTube has a number of good videos of play productions (as well as many bad ones), which I meant to highlight weeks ago. Well, better late than never. I am a great admirer of John M. Synge’s works, especially The Playboy of the Western World (my favorite play, even above Shakespeare). Two good (albeit flawed) versions of this are a professional one (part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVlJ_typfU0 and part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSHvsx0VkLA) and a charming, precocious version with teen actors (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tV_kYBeTatM). There is also a superbly acted and directed film of The Well of the Saints (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkWUg0s69Sk). Topping them all is a profoundly moving version of Vaughn Williams one-act opera, Riders to the Sea, a faithful rendition of Synge’s classic play, in 5 parts, six to ten minutes each (they should follow consecutively, but if not: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7rGs7px5Ok (part 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W885YFe93SI (part 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_gGFRvMZq8 (part 3), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw63m1ukRdQ (part 4), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSZe1EIo7NE (part 5).

This opera is in English, and it is very easy to understand the language. In addition it opens with a splendid brief introduction by an actor playing Synge, musing about the setting and background of the play (authentic quotations from The Aran Islands ).

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Following up my previous post, here are a couple more recommendations. The 1977 television production of Our Town (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEoXuXRoOdY) is the best of the many versions of this classic American play that I have seen. The superlative cast features Hal Holbrook, who was born to play the Stage Manager, and a radiant Glynnis O’Connor. The production design follows Thornton Wilder’s original minimalist conception.

A good (not great) television version of Waiting for Godot, from 1961, is most notable for the star performers, Burgess Meredith and Zero Mostel (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvjoyEQZza4). The play begins at 2:05. Unfortunately, a much better TV version from the 1980s is not available on YouTube.

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I do a headstand for an hour to kill time.

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That’s a very piquant comment for me, as it reminds me of something I had forgotten. When my daughter was very young, sometime around kindergarten and early elementary grades, I used to joke in a variety of contexts, “We could stand on our heads.” It began I think when she once asked, “What should we do?” It became our private joke. Thank you.

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That was my grandpa’s standard answer to bored kids asking “What should we do?” - “Standing on the head and laugh, and catch flies with the feet.”

In German, the answer kind of rhymes with the question. “Was sollen wir machen?” “Auf dem Kopf stehn und lachen, und mit den Füßen Fliegen fangen.”

I’m sure he was sometimes told the same when he was a kid. :wink:

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That’s really interesting! My use of it was entirely spontaneous. Your parallel suggests that this may be a folk jest motif. I wonder how widespread the use of this idea is?

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I found that personal growth and reading has really helped me. I read my Bible and meditate on His love and promises.

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Just ran into this thread and I see some really good stuff here! I am actually home schooled so my education has not been affected much during this time. Moreover, I have had a lot to do this year and fell behind in some subjects. So this has been a great opportunity for me to catch up. During the summer after I finish my studies, I am going to take @Conrad_Melville’s suggestion of picking up some more reading which I need to be better about. Have you ever read H. Rider Haggard’s Allan Quartermain series Conrad? It is a true but less known classic with plenty of action. Probably one of my dad’s favorite collections as well. Some of the books in that series are a little harder to obtain though.

Also, I plan to take some personal math courses on Khan Academy this summer as I need to take math a bit more seriously now. Will eventually need to get back into computer programming too!

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Yes, I read King Solomon’s Mines when I was very young, about 10 I think, and really loved it. I followed up with Allan Quartermain and She, but I have never reread them. When my mother died many years ago, my father disposed of her set of great works (pub: Walter J. Black, 1928). but I took possession of the Haggard volume for sentimental reasons (with those novels and two others) and the volume of Theophile Gautier, which I wanted to read.

Welcome back. Your comparative absence has been noticed.

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Good stuff! And yeah I look forward to getting back into the game and the community some more as things continue to lighten up for me so thanks for the warm welcome back! Another thing to think about as far as reading is John Buchan’s Richard Hannay series. Have you ever read any of those such as Greenmantle or The Thrity-Nine Steps? That’s another great action series that my father says is really good and similar to Allan Quartermain. I have also skimmed through your book-reading thread and will have to take a good look at that. You have a good taste for classical literature!

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Although I am a great fan of the movie of The Thirty-Nine Steps, with Robert Donat, I have never read it or anything else by Buchan. I tried reading his The Gap in the Curtain, about several people who get to see a glimpse of the future, but I thought it was poorly written and gave up. A forgotten espionage classic in the same vein as 39 Steps is The Great Impersonation by E. Phillips Oppenheim. Oppenheim was a bestselling author in the early 20th century, but most of his other works are unreadable today. For straight adventure, my favorites are Jack London (no comment needed) and Robert E. Howard. Ironically, Howard’s Conan series is the least of his work. His best work lies in his horror stories, his Solomon Kane series, and his historical and desert adventures. All of these have been reprinted in thick paperback volumes in the last 20 years (Ballantine/Del Rey).

I can’t leave this topic without recommending my two favorite books from childhood (if you haven;t already read them): Robinson Crusoe and Treasure Island. They are actually as excellent for adults as for children. I reread RC last year and was astonished at how modern the writing was. As for TI, I reread it about 20 years ago, and I enjoy telling people it is the world’s only perfect novel. Not the best, but perfect (i.e., flawless in every way). Aspiring writers should study it closely.

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Awesome! I will have to keep those suggestions in mind! I have indeed read Robinson Crusoe and Treasure Island and thought they were both great books, but I was only ~9 years old at the time so it would definitely be good to go back and reread them as I am not sure how much I was able to comprehend at that time. I will start posting the books I read when I start and finish them within your reading thread throughout the summer to keep myself accountable and pick up more suggestions from you if necessary. My goal is to be done with this year of school by the very start of June, so that should be when I start my goals. Reading is one of those things that is sadly becoming abandoned by my generation but my father and grandfather have always told me that it is one of the keys to developing an intelligent and wise character.

For my schooling, I am currently reading A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. It has really opened my mind up to the French Revolution and I think it is one of the better books I have read lately. Captain Blood by Raphael Sabatini is another new favorite that I have recently read.

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