Language Learners' Library

It’s quite easy, just select the whole table below and copy it, you’ll see how it works

A B
C D
2 Likes

@Sanonius, about demonstrative pronouns: I wasn’t aware (or forgot) that Latin distinguishes distance between second person and third person. It’s like Japanese in that regard.

Japanese has it both for demonstrative pronouns and other demonstrative adverbs:

First person Second person Third person Interrogative
これ
this one (near me)
それ
that one (near you)
あれ
that one (distant)
どれ
which
この
this (near me)
その
that (near you)
あの
that (distant)
どの
what
ここ
here (near me)
そこ
there (near you)
あそこ
there (distant)
どこ
where
こちら
over here (near me)
そちら
over there (near you)
あちら
over there (distant)
どちら
which way
こう
(in) this way / with my method
そう
(in) that way / with your method
ああ
(in) that way (distant)
どう
how
こんな
this kind of (near me)
そんな
that kind of (near you)
あんな
that kind of (distant)
どんな
what kind of

It existed in English as well, for example: here (proximity to speaker), there (proximity to listener), yonder (distant from both). In modern English there has largely absorbed the meaning of yonder.

Yonder was also used for the pronouns, see this Wiki page.

3 Likes

That looks really neat, thank you. It’s interesting how that system is extended not only to directions but also manners. It Latin there’s ita ‘this way’, and circumscriptions that literally mean ‘this way’, and ‘that way’ (hoc/isto/illo modo). I quite like the Japanese ああ〜…

German’s got three distances, too: hier, da, dort, but “da” is rather in general proximity than precisely around the listener. I wonder if there are languages with four or more. Maybe one for objects one can’t see.

2 Likes

Well, in English you can say “right here” or “to hand”.

“right here”
“here”
“there”
“over there” / “yonder”

It sorta works :stuck_out_tongue:

PS. yes, ofc no-one has said yonder this century

1 Like

The Doctor used ‘yonder’ once when he explained stuff to Mr. Chesterfield.

That particular reference is lost on me, I’m afraid. Are you talking about Ian Chesterton?

Right, it’s technically a new day. That means I’ve gotta:

  1. Roll for a script of the day
  2. Read Sanonius’s post about demonstrative pronouns
  3. Make a grammar and vocabulary challenge
  4. Tidy the thread
1 Like

Hi! To find out what I can do, say @discobot display help.

@discobot roll 1d60

:game_die: 22

@discobot roll 1d99

:game_die: 33

Wait, that doesn’t work :stuck_out_tongue:

@discobot roll 1d9

:game_die: 6

The Script of the Day is Elbasan! (Seems like they don’t render on Firefox, though :expressionless: )

1 Like

When I look up on Wiki and the first sentence is:

In general linguistics, a reflexive pronoun , sometimes simply called a reflexive, is an anaphoric pronoun that must be coreferential with another nominal (its antecedent within the same clause.)

I see, you say I must first summon a helpful daemon with this spell and he will tell me what a reflexive pronoun is

Nah, they gave a clear explanation underneath so I can’t hate :wink:

1 Like

Just waiting for someone to finish editing the header, then I can get tidying. I’m going to delete my more off-topic posts and provide quick links to the past challenges and discussions.

Tidying starts now :slight_smile:

Can’t delete any more of my posts for two hours :expressionless: guess it’s time for link organisation

1 Like