Kibitzing visible to players if they are signed out. Could it be fixed? (EDIT: for correspondence games)

I wondered whether visibility of kibitzing should perhaps be limited to signed-in users, to make it not-accidentally-visible to players in a game.

Of course a player could create a second account, but that’s more like active cheating, and less like accidentally stumbling upon some analysis of a game-in-progress.

Update: These thoughts come from a correspondence tournament, not from live games. Thanks to replies for highlighting the use-cases I had not considered. Now I wonder if different behaviour for correspondence or live games would be confusing. Minimal suggestion is: adjust links in “your turn” emails to specifically hide the kibitzing?

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I think there is some tradeoff in that new users may not immediately want to log in, but may want to view the kibitz.

These days, more sites are requiring you to log in for full commentary (I’m thinking Twitter specifically :joy:) so maybe it’s not such a crazy thing to lock it down though.

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Using Twitter to justify something as not crazy? :thinking::thinking::thinking:

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I’d like to see this as well - notably for Malkovich …

… although I’m not clear on how a person in a live game in progress can accidentally “stumble, logged out, onto one of their games in progress”?

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I see many guest accounts visiting relays of important games, I think it’s too much to make them go through registering an account. And denying them access seems excessive.

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I think Malkovich should stay visible for logged out users even if kibitz chat isn’t, as a huge point of it is to allow a player to one way communicate to spectators

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I lean that way as well, but either way it’s a compromise

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I should have specified that I’m only thinking of correspondence games. It happened in two games in our recent tournament, which lead me to bring up the topic here.

I agree that visitors for live games benefit much from being able to observe kibitzing in realtime. So I could argue againt my own suggestion…

One idea to reduce risk in correspondence games: the link to the game in the email saying “it’s your turn” could include a query-parameter to hide kibitzing. I think in the second game where this complaint came up, it was the email link. For my own game, I once saw the kibitzing because of some sign-in glitches… I can’t remember the details, just that I’m generally always-signed-in, so that authenticated status just temporarily failed somehow, somewhere.

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I disagree with this idea, because I imagine Malkovich usage would be more useful to an opponent than Kibitzing. As in my previous message though: if we’re talking about live games, I am not advocating for a change in policy. I can very much understand the use cases and imagine people have grown accustomed to them. (I don’t have data or direct experience though.)

Now back to the narrower topic I mean to raise: correspondence games?

I’m wondering if there are any correspondence games that gain any significant number of (signed-out) spectators?

Spam? Should I flag this?

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That is not spam. It is an example where the entire game was one huge kibitz by all the participants. Similar endeavors would be problematic under the proposal.

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How would an endeavor like that be affected? The kibitz occured in the forums right? And is there any evidence there were a lot of signed-out spectators?


For examples of signed-out viewing, I think official/professional games draw more guest spectators, but I can’t think of any correspondence examples.

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Ok that is a kind of manual game (opposed to the standard format) but just to show that in a correspondance time setting you can have a lot of players taking interest (and sometimes participating or sometimes just watching).

And i know that more team games were played as this one.

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Ah, you are right. I was thinking of the OGS versus Leela game, in which the move discussions did occur in the game chat. So my point still stands, but with a different reference.

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